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Healthy Vegetable Seed Medley

$16.95

Availability: In stock

Short Description

We asked Territorial Seed "What are your best selling seeds?" 

Here are their top picks:

  1. Super Sugar Snap Pea
  2. Patio Star Squash
  3. Red Samurai Carrots
  4. Patio Snacker Cucumber
  5. Little Snowpea White

All in one pack! Leafcutter bees help 4 of them produce! 

Description

Details

Super Sugar Snap Pea

Seed DepthSeed SpacingSoil Temp for Germ.Days to Germ.Thin Plants ToApproximately 90-165 seeds per ounce.
1-1 1/2″1″40-75°F8-25Not Required

Pisum sativum: Peas nourish our bodies with phytonutrients and, surprisingly, with omega-3 fatty acids. A hard-working crop, they improve the soil, fixing nitrogen that will feed future crops. Especially easy to grow in cool seasons. Snap peas have edible pods that are sweetest as the pods fatten up. High in vitamin C and niacin, they are most nutritious when fresh and briefly cooked. For the best nutrition and flavor, grow your own crops. Snap peas are the most productive of all the types of peas. Some snap peas develop strings that are easily removed by peeling them back as the pods are harvested.

CULTURE: A cool-season crop, peas will grow in a variety of soils provided the soil is well drained, in full sun, and contains a sufficient amount of organic matter to allow for good moisture retention. Peas may be sown as soon as the soil can be worked in the spring. They may be planted without rototilling by scratching out a shallow furrow and covering the seed. Sow seeds in rows 18-24 inches apart. Coat the seed with an inoculant to increase yields. Inoculant enhances early nitrogen-fixing bacterial nodes on the plant roots. Side dress plants with 1 cup of our complete fertilizer and 1/2 cup bone meal per 5 row feet to foster healthy plants for a bountiful harvest. Climbing varieties must be trellised or planted by a fence. Most bush-type vines can be supported on a short trellis or allowed to grow as a mound. Stress, such as prolonged hot weather or lack of moisture, will cause a higher percentage of off-type plants and reduced yields. We recommend mulching the roots and frequent ground watering (vs. overhead watering) to help keep the roots cool and productive.
DISEASES: Fusarium wilt (also called pea root rot) causes plant foliage to turn brown from the ground up. This can generally be controlled by crop rotation and sowing on well-drained ground. Choosing resistant varieties and ground watering can control powdery and downy mildews. Areas in the Northwest and Northeast are also prone to attacks of pea enation mosaic virus, which is spread by the peach aphids that hatch each summer. The virus causes 'windowing' or a mosaic appearance in the leaves, distortion of the pods, and reduced yields. If pea enation is a problem in your garden, we advise sowing enation-resistant varieties. The best control measures are using disease-free seed, selecting disease-resistant cultivars, and practicing crop rotation.
INSECTS: The pea aphid can be a destructive pea insect pest throughout the summer. Applications of Pyrethrin should be started at the seedling stage if leaf scalloping is observed.
HARVEST: Start checking for maturity as soon as the pods begin to swell. If left on the vine too long, the peas become starchy and the pods become tough. Most bush varieties are bred to mature all at the same time for a concentrated, once-over picking. Extend your harvest through multiple sowings. Store peas at 32°F and at 95% relative humidity. Pea vine tendrils are an important ingredient in stir-fries, Asian salads, and garnishes. Market gardeners pick the top 6-8 inches of pea vines (tendrils) and sell them in bunches. Cascadia, Oregon Giant and Oregon Sugar Pod II are favorite pea tendril varieties.
SEED SPECS: Minimum germination standard: 80%. Days to maturity are calculated from the date of direct seeding. Note: In areas with mild winters such as the maritime Northwest, where peas can be planted in February, add 35-40 days. Usual seed life: 2 years.

KEY TO PEA DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
HR indicates high resistance.
IR indicates intermediate resistance.
AF | Ascochyta
DM | Downy Mildew
E | Enation Mosaic Virus
F* | Fusarium Wilt
PEMV | Pea Enation Mosaic Virus
PLR | Pea Leaf Roll Virus
PM | Powdery Mildew
* Numbers indicate specific disease race.

Patio Star Squash

Seed DepthSeed SpacingSoil Temp for Germ.Days to Germ.Thin Plants ToSee individual varieties for seed count.
1-1 1/2″3-4 per hill65-85°F5-101-2 per hill

Cucurbita spp.: In the diverse family of squash are true nutritional powerhouses, encompassing a wide array of forms, flavors, colorations, and culinary applications. Squash are rich in the carotenoids necessary for vitamin A production and boast a wide complement of amino acids. While starchy, most of the carbohydrates in the fruit come from special polysaccharides, pectins, which have exhibited strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic, insulin-regulating properties. Summer squash are a typically prolific garden classic.

CULTURE: Squash and pumpkins prefer good fertile soil and plenty of sunshine. Start indoors or in a greenhouse 3-4 weeks prior to your last frost. Sow in a 3 inch Peat or Cow Pot for direct transplanting. For best results transplant prior to the second set of true leaves. Plant the entire Peat or Cow Pot with no part of the pot exposed to the air. Work 1/2 cup of our complete fertilizer into the soil around each plant. For direct sowing, plant after your last frost and when the soil has warmed to at least 60°F. Sow with 3-4 feet between bush varieties, and 4-5 feet between vining varieties. Distance between rows: 6-10 feet. Squash need just-barely-damp soil to germinate. Too much moisture causes the seed to rot. All squash are monoecious (bearing separate male and female flowers on the same plant), and most require bee and insect activity for successful pollination. Poor fruit set is often the result of poor pollination.
INSECTS/PESTS: The major insect pests are the spotted and striped cucumber beetles, vine borers and squash bugs. Use row covers and/or apply Pyrethrin to reduce and control damage. Butternut varieties have a solid stem and are resistant to vine borer damage.
DISEASES: Squash are susceptible to a number of fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases that vary between regions. Your local county extension agent can help you pinpoint your particular problem.
HARVEST: Pick baby summer squash as well as the more mature ones. In general, summer squash are most tender and flavorful when very young. Winter squash are best left on the vine until fully mature. It should require quite a bit of pressure before your fingernail pierces through the rind into the flesh. For the best sugar content, cut the stem an inch or so from the body after the first light frost, and if the weather is dry, let them cure in the field. If temperatures drop below 25°F, bring your harvest inside and store in a cool dry location.
SEED SPECS: Minimum germination standard: 75%. Usual seed life: 3-4 years. Days to maturity: from date of direct seeding; if transplanting, subtract 10 days. 

KEY TO SQUASH DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
HR indicates high resistance.
IR indicates intermediate resistance.
CMV | Cucumber Mosaic Virus
PM | Powdery Mildew
PRV | Papaya Ringspot Virus
WMV* | Watermelon Mosaic Virus
ZYMV | Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus
* Numbers indicate specific disease race.

Red Samurai Carrots

Seed DepthSeed SpacingSoil Temp for Germ.Days to Germ.Thin Plants ToApproximately 650-750 seeds per gram.
1/4″4 per in.55-80°F6-211-3″

Daucus carota var. sativus Studies on the nutritional properties of carrots have revealed that they are powerhouses of a wide range of phytonutrient antioxidants. With the vast spectrum of colors and varieties available, the amounts of individual antioxidants vary, yet the overall balance of these potent nutrients contributes to outstanding health benefits regardless of the variety.

CULTURE: The key to good carrot production is soil preparation. When the soil is somewhat dry, spade or till it to a fine texture 12-16 inches deep. Avoid the temptation to work the soil when it's too wet. Cloddy ground will not make smooth straight roots. Work in lots of composted organic matter, as this will help your soil maintain a very loose condition for uniform root development. Avoid fresh manure or excess nitrogen fertilizer which can cause forks, splits, and rough hairy roots. Optimum pH range for carrots is 5.5-7.0. Direct sow March through July. Consider making your last sowing an overwintering variety. Sow the seeds thinly in rows 12-16 inches apart. Cover the seed with vermiculite or sifted compost. This prevents crusting and helps retain moisture. Mix 1/4 teaspoon of seed in a gallon of sand or vermiculite to uniformly sow 30-50 row feet. Maintain an even soil moisture level at all times. Thin carefully to get the most uniformly sized roots. When the plants have 7-10 leaves, hill 1-2 inches of soil around the crowns to prevent green shoulders.
INSECTS: Carrot fly maggots can be controlled by covering the rows with insect barrier fabric at planting.
DISEASE: Carrots are subject to various blights; practicing a 3-year crop rotation and proper sanitation can prevent most problems.
HARVEST: Carrots are best harvested any time their color is bright. This is when their flavor and texture are optimum. Irrigate well prior to harvest to ensure the roots have absorbed their maximum capacity of water. Store at 34°F and 95% relative humidity.
SEED SPECS: Minimum germination standard: 75%. Usual seed life: 3 years. 

What is pelleted seed?
Seed that has been coated with a clay-based material to form a larger, round shape. This makes planting by hand or mechanical seeder easier and allows for more controlled sowing of small seeds such as carrots or lettuce. All pelleted seed has a National Organic Program (NOP) approved coating.

KEY TO CARROT DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
HR indicates high resistance.
IR indicates intermediate resistance.
AB | Early (Alternaria) Blight
AS | Alternaria Stem Canker
C | Cercospora
CS | Cavity Spot
P | Phythium Root Rot
PM | Powdery Mildew

Patio Snacker Cucumbers

Seed DepthSeed SpacingSoil Temp for Germ.Days to Germ.Thin Plants ToApproximately 25-30 seeds per gram.
1/2″4-6 per hill65-90°F4-131-2 per hill

Cucumis sativus A favorite in cuisine worldwide, cucumbers possess health benefits too numerous to mention. Incorporate cucumbers in your diet to aid with weight loss, as they are exceptionally low in calories (only about 8 calories in 1/2 cup), aid digestion, and rid toxins from the body. Among the more unusual qualities of the humble cuke is its ability to ease skin irritations. Use a piece of cucumber skin to soothe burns.

CULTURE: For the best yields, it is important to provide ideal growing conditions for cucumbers. If the weather is not warm and dry, vines grow slowly and plants tend to fall prey to disease. Wait to direct sow or transplant until soil warms. For best germination, keep the soil lightly moist but not too wet.
TO DIRECT SOW: We recommend raised beds. They improve drainage, warm up earlier, and increase the root zone depth. Space the groups about 3-4 feet apart in all directions. Under each group of seeds, work 1/2-1 cup of our complete fertilizer into the soil. After the seed is up and growing, thin plants.
FOR TRANSPLANTS: Not recommended, but in short-season climates, starting seed indoors may be necessary. Cucumber transplants don't like their roots disturbed, so start them in individual 3 1/2 inch Peat pots. Fill pots with a sterile seedling mix. After they've emerged, place the seedlings in a sunny, warm spot. They should only be about 3 weeks old when transplanted in the garden. Harden off for about a week in a cold frame. The entire peat pot can be planted making sure the entire pot rim is below the soil surface. If any part is above ground, it will wick moisture away from the roots and weaken plants. Space and fertilize as described above for direct sowing.
MULCHES & PLANT COVERS: These materials have been proven to help plants grow faster, flower sooner, and yield more fruit. We recommend green or silver mulch, plus a floating row cover of Grow Guard 20 or Reemay early in the season to achieve these results.
DISEASE: Where disease is a known problem, choose resistant varieties. Remove plant refuse and control insect pests. Consult your local county extension agent for disease specifics.
INSECTS/PESTS: Control striped and spotted cucumber beetles with Pyrethrin; apply regularly as long as beetles are evident. They primarily infect plants with bacterial wilt disease, which is devastating to plants. Keep border areas of the garden mowed.
HARVEST: Keep your cucumbers picked, and they'll keep producing. When stored at 40°F and 95% relative humidity, they may last up to 3 weeks. Chickens like big cucumbers.
SEED SPECS: Minimum germination standard: 80%. Days to maturity are calculated from the date of direct seeding. Usual seed life: 3 years.

KEY TO FLOWERS AND FRUIT SET
GY | Gynoecious - Has all female flowers.
HE | Hermaphrodite - Flowers contain both male and female reproductive parts.
MO | Monoecious - Has separate male and female flowers on the same plant.
PAT | Parthenocarpic - Has the ability to set fruit without pollination. Triggered by low temperatures, short day length, and plant age.

KEY TO CUCUMBER DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
HR indicates high resistance.
IR indicates intermediate resistance.
A | Anthracnose
ALS | Angular Leaf Spot
C | Cercospora
CCa | Corynespora Blight & Target Spot
CCu | Scab & Gummosis
CMV | Cucumber Mosaic Virus
CVYV | Cucumber Vein Yellowing Virus
DM | Downy Mildew
PM | Powdery Mildew
R | Common Rust
S | Scab
TSP | Target Spot

Little Snowpeas

Seed DepthSeed SpacingSoil Temp for Germ.Days to Germ.Thin Plants ToApproximately 90-165 seeds per ounce.
1-1 1/2″1″40-75°F8-25Not Required

Pisum sativum: Peas nourish our bodies with phytonutrients and, surprisingly, with omega-3 fatty acids. A hard-working crop, they improve the soil, fixing nitrogen that will feed future crops. Especially easy to grow in cool seasons. Snap peas have edible pods that are sweetest as the pods fatten up. High in vitamin C and niacin, they are most nutritious when fresh and briefly cooked. For the best nutrition and flavor, grow your own crops. Snap peas are the most productive of all the types of peas. Some snap peas develop strings that are easily removed by peeling them back as the pods are harvested.

CULTURE: A cool-season crop, peas will grow in a variety of soils provided the soil is well drained, in full sun, and contains a sufficient amount of organic matter to allow for good moisture retention. Peas may be sown as soon as the soil can be worked in the spring. They may be planted without rototilling by scratching out a shallow furrow and covering the seed. Sow seeds in rows 18-24 inches apart. Coat the seed with an inoculant to increase yields. Inoculant enhances early nitrogen-fixing bacterial nodes on the plant roots. Side dress plants with 1 cup of our complete fertilizer and 1/2 cup bone meal per 5 row feet to foster healthy plants for a bountiful harvest. Climbing varieties must be trellised or planted by a fence. Most bush-type vines can be supported on a short trellis or allowed to grow as a mound. Stress, such as prolonged hot weather or lack of moisture, will cause a higher percentage of off-type plants and reduced yields. We recommend mulching the roots and frequent ground watering (vs. overhead watering) to help keep the roots cool and productive.
DISEASES: Fusarium wilt (also called pea root rot) causes plant foliage to turn brown from the ground up. This can generally be controlled by crop rotation and sowing on well-drained ground. Choosing resistant varieties and ground watering can control powdery and downy mildews. Areas in the Northwest and Northeast are also prone to attacks of pea enation mosaic virus, which is spread by the peach aphids that hatch each summer. The virus causes 'windowing' or a mosaic appearance in the leaves, distortion of the pods, and reduced yields. If pea enation is a problem in your garden, we advise sowing enation-resistant varieties. The best control measures are using disease-free seed, selecting disease-resistant cultivars, and practicing crop rotation.
INSECTS: The pea aphid can be a destructive pea insect pest throughout the summer. Applications of Pyrethrin should be started at the seedling stage if leaf scalloping is observed.
HARVEST: Start checking for maturity as soon as the pods begin to swell. If left on the vine too long, the peas become starchy and the pods become tough. Most bush varieties are bred to mature all at the same time for a concentrated, once-over picking. Extend your harvest through multiple sowings. Store peas at 32°F and at 95% relative humidity. Pea vine tendrils are an important ingredient in stir-fries, Asian salads, and garnishes. Market gardeners pick the top 6-8 inches of pea vines (tendrils) and sell them in bunches. Cascadia, Oregon Giant and Oregon Sugar Pod II are favorite pea tendril varieties.
SEED SPECS: Minimum germination standard: 80%. Days to maturity are calculated from the date of direct seeding. Note: In areas with mild winters such as the maritime Northwest, where peas can be planted in February, add 35-40 days. Usual seed life: 2 years.

KEY TO PEA DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
HR indicates high resistance.
IR indicates intermediate resistance.
AF | Ascochyta
DM | Downy Mildew
E | Enation Mosaic Virus
F* | Fusarium Wilt
PEMV | Pea Enation Mosaic Virus
PLR | Pea Leaf Roll Virus
PM | Powdery Mildew
* Numbers indicate specific disease race

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